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Art Knapp
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So Much More Than Plants
So Much More Than Plants
Art Knapp

Art Knapp Articles

Plant Your Fall Bulbs to Enjoy a Blooming Spring

in Tips and Tutorials

planting bulbs in fall

With fall weather in full bloom, many gardeners are starting to forget about their gardens – but those gardeners may be missing out on one of the best times to plant bulbs!

 

Fall bulbs are a favorite among both beginner and master gardeners, because there are so few issues to consider. Planting in the fall allows a jumpstart to spring garden growth, and the cool weather can provide a more enjoyable working experience comparing to the hot summer months.

 

Bulbs should be planted as soon as the ground is cool, and at least 6 – 8 weeks before the ground starts to freeze. Bulbs can be planted just about anywhere in a garden as long as the soil has a good drainage system. It is best to avoid areas where water collects, such as the bottoms of hills as bulbs do not like to be kept wet.

 

Preparations for the planting bed should include digging the soil so that it is loose and workable, and adding organic matter such as compost if necessary.

 

Once spring roll around, spread an organic fertilizer over the area or a slow release bulb food to fertilize the bulbs. When flowers have completed blooming, cut th flower head off but do not cut the foliage. Bulbs use their foliage to gather nutrients from the sun and store for the next seasons. Once the foliage has turned yellow or brown, you may cut them to the ground level in preparation for the next season.


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